A Dozen Diamonds That Gave A Shine To An Otherwise Murky 2016

Julia Holter

Julia Holter

Well here we are, on the cusp of yet another new year.  Who’d have guessed that as we stumbled unsteadily in a post-Christmas toxic daze towards 2016 that it would prove to be one of the murkiest, most unsettling and quite frankly disturbing of years.  One can only hope, and there is always hope, that this coming year will bring gladder tidings and a lot more joy than its predecessor.

Musically, 2016 had many, many highs.  It also shared several heartbreaking lows not least amongst which were the untimely deaths of Prince, George Michael and David Bowie – three of the rather large cohort of celebrities and legends who passed away in this year of darkness.  While those legends who died were predominantly male, much of this year’s sparkle mainly came from the female stars of the music world.  Lady GaGa, Beyonce, Marissa Nadler, Taylor Swift, Julia Holter … just some of the big female names that featured in the 2016 musical calendar.

Not surprisingly, some of them feature in my Dozen Diamonds of 2016 – a playlist of songs by international artists, with a select contribution from our part-time contributor, Eddie Sweetman.  Interestingly, the two artists selected for inclusion by Sweets are both male, while mine are predominantly female. Those choices themselves would probably make for an interesting case-study!

So which songs, by which artists made it into our top twelve, and why?

12. Margaret Glaspy – Pins and Needles (USA)

Strong, feisty country tinged indie with an edge.  There’s a waft of punk attitude blowing through the gritty melody, and more than a hint of steely determination in the ballsy lyrics.  The right side of rock for my tastes; tastes which I seem to share with most of BBC Introducing, BBC6 Music and BBC 1 … not a bad benchmark. Classy, savvy, strong, energised sounds from a lady who’s going places.

11. Birdy – Wild Horses (UK)

Twilit voiced, inspired poet and musical prodigy, Jasmine Lucilla Elizabeth Jennifer van den Bogaerde aka Birdy, has seen her star rise, and rise, and explode.  World class productions are now the order of the day but Birdy still holds on to the spiritual and emotional qualities so inherent in her earlier more gauche works.  With a vocal range that can scale mountainous heights and scrummage fireplace ashes, this super-talented musician could craft a song from the nothingness of a silken spiderweb and make it a masterclass in songwriting and performance.

Her 2016 album, ‘Beautiful Lies’ was a gift to the world – a finer, more emotive, and splendid talent you will struggle to find, and with even greater things sure to come, the future is “global” for this little songbird.

10. The Last Shadow Puppets – Les Cactus (UK)

Like them or loathe them TLSP are nothing if not entertaining. Seeing them live in Oslo was akin to watching a human firework display crossed with the energiser bunny thrice spliced with Poitin.  A pair of musicians who have most certainly put the roll back into rock, Turner & Kane may take the music seriously, but the live performances are treated more like a fun ride on the amusements. Never ones to shy away from taking the piss out of themselves, the video for their cover of ‘Les Cactus’, is a classic example of TLSP ‘on form’. As a cover, it pales in comparison to the Jacques Dutronc original, but as a piece of entertainment, it doesn’t fall short.

9.  Ed Harcourt – Occupational Hazard (UK)

Intense, moody, brooding, cavernous, blazing, ferocious – just some of the words I would use to describe Ed Harcout’s 2016 scorcher of an album, ‘Furnaces’, every pun intended.  One of the standouts LP releases of the year, ‘Furnaces’ reached out to and drew into its fold, a broader, more diverse audience than any of the Englishman’s albums had hitherto succeeded in doing.  I was drawn hook, line and sinker to this track because of the wolverine intensity of the guitar sequences and brutal rawness of the lyrics, the combination of which is addictive.  Brutal ingenuity at its bloody finest.

8. Radiohead – Burn the Witch (UK)

The first of two entries from the worlds greatest band EVER, ‘Burn the Witch’ was one of a pair of picks by sometime contributor Eddie Sweetman.  In his words, “incisive, relevant an astonishing comeback and the highlight in my opinion of the album.”  Need we say more?

7.  Amber Arcades – Fading Lines (NL)

What can I say.  I fell in love with this song on first play.  Like a 21st century incarnation of The Cardigans,  Annelotte de Graaf has all the dreamy deliciousness of that Nina Persson vocal, along with plenty of her antecedents uber Nordic cool!  Sexy, edgy, inviting indie-pop with a swirl of darkness running across its shiny exterior.

6. David Bowie – I Can’t Give Everything Away (UK)

The second of Mr Sweets’ picks, and a poignant one at that.  ‘Blackstar’ was a huge favourite amongst the bloggerati and a fitting finale from a gifted man, musician, artist, performer & more, who was truly one of a kind.  On his selection of this particular track Eddie explains: “This was the last track Bowie ever released. Poignant and delicate. Even more so now that we know he was aware he was dying.”  A fitting tribute I think you’ll agree.

5. Marissa Nadler – The Best You Ever Had (USA)

Sadly sickness struck (again) when Marissa Nadler came to town … “out damn ‘germ’ out I say” said I, alas to no avail.  Laid low, my chance to see this bewitching enchantress weave her goth clothed spells was gone in the blink of 24 hours (the length of time it takes me to go from apparently healthy to woefully ill).  I had sped towards Nadler like a bee to honey on the recommendation of my ‘pen as sword’ icon, tQ scrivener John Doran, who had bade me not to miss her more than magical live performance.  Instead, I’ve had to make do with looping replays of her album, ‘Bury Your Name’ from which this is my stand out track. Delish!

4. Julia Jacklin – Coming of Age (Aus)

The new age Little Miss Firecracker of country-grunge hits Dublin at the end of February 2017 and nothing, I mean NOTHING will stop, hinder or hamper my path to Whelans! Elbows at the ready, that space up the front is mine. Part of that new wave of punky twang that includes fellow upcoming songstrel Margaret Glaspy, Julia Jacklin takes smartly honed real-life lyrics and sandwiches them between slices of heaving melodies chock full of punchy guitars layered over a tightly woven R/S.  The result is impossible to resist infectious country stained down and dirty pop. Only a fool would miss the chance to see this raw and rousing talent shine live!

3. Radiohead – Identikit (UK)

2016 saw the arrival of what was possibly the most awaited album for years.  ‘A Moon Shaped Pool’ didn’t disappoint.  This piece of classic Radiohead was sheer musical perfection packed with all the innovative ingredients that have made this quintet the consummate musical giants that they are.  And while most blogs will have opted for either of the two singles, this off-kilter piece of jazz infused experimental alt transports me back to the halcyon days of ‘Kid A’.  With its lyrical nods to Murakami’s 1Q84 (there was a similar intertwine between ‘Kid A’ and Kafka on the Shore), haunting interludes from vocal ghosts, and natty, spacious percussion Identikit is the understated star in this a stellar compilation.

2. Julia Holter – Lucette Stranded on the Island (USA)

Yeah, yeah I know.  The album was released in 2015.  But for me 2016 was all about Julia Holter.  Having failed to make her Dublin concert earlier in the year, one of the main catalysts for my travelling to Oya in Oslo, was the chance to make up for that lost experience.  While thirty minutes was far too short to soak up the musical enchantment magicked by an artist of Holter’s calibre, as luck would have it, Julia returned to Dublin in November and gave, what was for me and the several hundred other spellbound concert-goers in Vicar Street, the live performance of the year.  Compelling, captivating, magical, powerful, innovative – Julia Holter ranks as one of the most outstanding of contemporary female artists. This ingenious track just goes to prove it.

1. Weyes Blood – Generation Why (USA)

Not since hearing Dusty Springfield sing ‘The Look of Love’ have I come across another female vocal that radiates such warmth and richness, with a darkness edged with light. A voice with a true and unfaltering power cloaked in a sheath of softness like an iron fist in a velvet glove.  Not until that is, I heard the voice of Natalie Mering, the enigmatic talent behind music project, Weyes Blood. ‘Generation Why’, from the album ‘Front Row Seat To Earth’, is lyrically inspired and musically fresh, and while it contains many of the default elements of a classic pop song, it is the shades of daring alien electronica and the edgy undertones to words sung with angelic clarity that take this song to altogether another level.

The inclusion of so many American artists reflects the shifting sands of my musical tastes during 2016.  For me personally, this has been quite a remarkable year in terms of the quality and diversity of the music that’s been released.  And while the likes of Bieber, Rihanna and A-Z of Hip Hop may dominate the charts, the greater wealth lies in those treasures which remain beloved of those worthier barometers of musical greatness – The Guardian Culture, DiS and my personal fave, The Quietus.

I’ll leave you with a Spotify list of the 12 tracks featured in this sparkling retrospective … and hope you enjoy them as much as both Eddie and I have done.  May 2017 bring more shimmering gems to brighten up our sometimes more than mundane lives!

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Eurovision Songwriters … This is Louis Walsh Calling!

Louis Walsh and Brendan Murray outside the RTE Studios
Louis Walsh and Brendan Murray outside the RTE Studios

Louis Walsh appeared on the long running Irish TV chat show, The RTE Late Late Show on Friday, to make a surprise announcement regarding the Irish entry for Eurovision 2017.

Speaking to show-host Ryan Tubridy, Walsh announced that he personally had chosen the artist who will represent Ireland in the upcoming competition – erstwhile member of Hometown and former busker, Brendan Murray.  Murray, originally from Tuam, Co. Galway, has been working with Walsh since joining the Irish music legends latest boyband project back in 2014.  It was only recently announced that the members of Hometown were taking a break from the group to pursue individual projects.

Of the change in the selection process, Louis Walsh explained that while he had hand picked Murray as the performer, it was up to the songwriters of Ireland to produce the ‘winning song’.  “We have the talent Ryan” he told Tubridy, “I really want them to send me a love song, a ballad, something between Adele and Ed Sheeran … I really want an Irish songwriter to send me a song!”.

Before performing a live acoustic cover of Irish Euro Winner, ‘Hold Me Now’, originally performed by Mr. Eurovision Johnny Logan, Murray said: “I listen to the likes of John Legend and Sam Smith, so I really want a power ballad, the real deal, key change everything”!

Song entries should be sent to the RTE Entertainment department and entry closes at 5pm on Monday 16th January, 2017, full details below.  An RTÉ appointed panel that will include Louis Walsh, will select the winning song which will be performed by Brendan on The Late Late Show in early 2017.

So, if you think you can pull this kinda tune outta the bag, get your quill n ink out and start penning some words and humming some melodies!  Remember – BALLAD – something with oomph and emo!  And if you do enter, best of luck! x

Submissions be sent to:

Eurovision Song Entries, RTE Entertainment, Donnybrook, Dublin 4.

Heavy Heart Take Stock On ‘The Way Home’

Photo - http://www.rossmcclure.co.uk/
Photo – http://www.rossmcclure.co.uk/

With echoes of Lush casting ‘gazey shadows on its sonic periphery, ‘The Way Home’ is an impassioned piece of stentorian grunge distilled through the psychedelic waters of indie-thrum.  The latest in a line of monthly releases from London-based Heavy Heart, it’s quite the damning retrospective on the ‘annus horribilis’ that was GB 2016, especially if like 16million others, you were in the #Remain camp.

I’m no genius but my default interpretation, based on the lyrics, is that this is an indictment of Brexit and the divisions it has caused, the EU’s response to the Immigration crisis, and the collapse of the “land of the free” courtesy of King Trump and his court of clowns & chassis.

“When the kindest word is hard to find Turning on ourselves and taking sides”

The sense of determination coming from the strident guitar playing  is finely counter-balanced by the dreamy delicacy of vocalist Anna’s nuanced interpretation. An interpretation that belies the thread of disaffection running through the song.

“When the kindest word is hard to find, Turning on ourselves and taking sides
In the end we’re only wasting time, On each other we rely, rely, rely”

There’s plenty of fuzzed up drone and adrenalin pumping verve here to keep both psych-rock and indie lovers happy, whilst the cleverly crafted socio-political poetry should provide sufficient brain food for those who like their music ‘meaningful’.  Topped off with a captivating layer of vocal gauze, the ingredients are blended effortlessly to create a powerful invitation to engage and a striking signal that there is more to explore.

Listen to ‘The Way Home’ here while you take a gander at Heavy Heart’s social diaires

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ToY Release Anthem Against The Great #Brexit ‘Divide’

Photo Credits : Julian
Photo: FretBuzz

On the morning of 24th June, 2016, 16 million Britons awoke to the news that their vote had failed to secure their country’s continued membership of the European Union and that butt of many jokes, #Brexit, was now a not so comic reality.

While shock and disbelief numbed the 48% who had voted #Remain, unapologetic jubilation was the prize of those Euro naysayers who, having only just secured the narrowest of victories, had voted Great Britain “OUTsch” (Bild) of the EU.  The resultant media frenzy spawned taglines ranging from the stiff-upper lipped Guardian “Over. And Out” to the more pedestrian Mirror’s “So What The Hell Happens Now?”.  One headline, and its hilariously unforgettable image, stood apart from the rest …

Liberation
Liberation”Good Luck”

Team GB was no more. The union stood divided.  Two countries had voted remain … two for #Brexit, but by sheer weight of its population, England carried the #Leave vote.  So, how did it feel to wake up a ‘Remainer’ in that fractured state?

Questioning, accusatory and aggrieved, the sardonic lyrics of Temples of Youth‘s new single, ‘Divide’ take aim at the bewildering and worrying situation that they, like so many others, have found themselves in since that fateful Summer day.

As musically sparse as it is lyrically bleak, the song which is part lament, part political protest, echoes the shift in the mood of the British public from that of bewilderment to inflamed censoriousness, referencing the widely held expert and public opinion that the #Brexit campaign had been based on deceit and a litany of lies,

Divide

‘Come With Me Across The Divide, I Can’t Say It Won’t Be Full Of Lies‘ sings a beleaguered Jo Carson, whose vocal interpretation of this trenchant critique is one of remarkable restraint: a paradox that serves to heighten the sense of disillusionment and detachment felt by those youthful Britons, whose dreams have been shattered by the referendum result.  Vocal disaffection overlooks a desolate and barren soundscape created by Gumma’s doleful and spaciously played guitar and reflected in Carson’s leadránach percussion.  There is no happy ending here.  Only the dawning of the unknown reality of ‘splendid isolation’.

BBC Introducing-supported Temples of Youth, have ratcheted up some serious traction with both online music press and national radio, with Beeb ‘big guns’, Steve Lamacq and Huw Stephens, both well known for their enthusiastic support of upcoming artists, giving the duo’s music airplay on their primetime shows.

‘Divide‘ is ToY’s fifth self-produced/released single and available from 1st December.

In tandem with their single release, Temples Of Youth have kicked off a GoFundMe page to help them raise some spondulicks to fund a visual accompaniment for ‘Divide’ (for which they’ve already hatched plans) and invest in the necessary evil that is PR along with some additional recording equipment.  All you need is – the link – and your debit card! Simples.

In related news … Jo’s mum will be chatting with Dermot O’Leary about the new single and more during his BBC Radio 2 Show on Saturday from 3pm, details here – Dermot O’Leary Show. ‘Divide’ will receive its radio premiere on BBC Introducing Solent later that evening, between 8-9pm, details here.

And if, like me, you’ll be otherwise preoccupied, then you can listen back on BBC iPlayer Radio for up to 28 days.

The Temples of Youth Live Date Diary sees them play Castle Road Xmas Festival, Southsea on 4th December, followed by the Icebreaker Festival, Portsmouth on 28th January and The Boileroom, Guildford 11th February. Full details on their website, http://www.templesofyouth.co.uk/

Listen to the 2016 anthem for #Brexit’s disenfranchised youths & like Temples of Youth, make your voice heard #DontGetMadGetActive